Festival Psychedelic fashion

Contemporary psytrance festival clothing is versatile, comfortable and comes in various earthy and indigenous colours and prints.

The very culture of psytrance and hippie festivals is based on the notion of sustainability, which is reflected in the way people dress for festivals like Shiva Squad and OZORA. Even though these items of clothing, aren’t readily available at your neighbourhood mall or Forever 21, here are the ultimate statement pieces you need to nail the look!

1. The ever-flowy asymmetrical/tie&dye skirt. 

With this cotton ensemble, comfort is key.  An asymmetrical wrap skirt’s varying lengths make it easy to move in without making you look frumpy. The best way to wear this skirt would be to team it with a colourful gunjee of your choice. If you’re feeling a bit adventurous, you can always pick a bikini or a skimpy crop top to wear it with.

2. The pixie hood

The pixie hood is a psytrance festival staple as it serves a purpose apart from being fashionable. It is a stylized type hoodie, with a pointed red-riding-hood-esque jacket with deep pockets to keep your various paraphernalia. The main purpose of this hood is keeping you warm as many psytrance festivals take place in the winter or on hill-tops and such. They come in snazzy and patchwork style patterns, usually adorned with psychedelic designs and can be made into dresses as well.

Wear it over your favourite tie and dye skirt or leggings. Add a pair of combat boots to complete the look.

3. Harem Pants

Belly dancing or no belly dancing, harems are the most comfortable, unisex and fashion-forward item of clothing you can wear to a psy-trance festival. They’re roomy and great to dance and camp out in. Lots of them come in vibrant colours and interesting prints.

4. The grungy fanny pack

Fanny packs are great and amazingly useful additions to your hippie look. Not only are they spacious enough to store your valuables and various other ‘items’, they come with belts that will help secure them to your body quite snugly. Carrying a backpack or a handbag may be redundant when you can sport this trendy hands-free utility belt.

5. UV light leggings

UV light leggings have to be the coolest addition to festival fashion in years. While most psy-trance events involve a lot of  UV-ray lights and visuals, these snazzy leggings light up in trippy and pyschedlic patterns the minute blacklight or UV lights are turned on. These leggings definitely add that zest and pop to your outfit!

6. Pixie skirts

Pixie skirts are basically a combination of miniskirts and fanny packs.  They work as a proper outfit and cancel out the option of needing a utility belt, making them the most useful item of your boho-chic outfit. You can also wear them over pants, leggings or harem pants if need be.

– See more at: http://www.festivalsherpa.com/festival-fashion-6-psychedelic-outfits-you-should-wear-to-your-next-rave/#sthash.Sp00nIDx.dpuf

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Felix: The Stratos

Felix Baumgartner (born 20 April 1969) is an Austrian skydiver,daredevil and BASE jumper. He set world records for skydiving an estimated 39 km (24 mi), reaching an estimated speed of 1,357.64 km/h (843.6 mph), or Mach 1.25, on 14 October 2012, and became the first person to break the sound barrier without vehicular power on his descent. He broke skydiving records for exit altitude, vertical freefall distance without drogue, and vertical speed without drogue. Though he still holds the latter records, the first was broken two years later, when on 24 October 2014, Alan Eustace jumped from 135,890 feet – or, 41.42 km (25.74 mi) with a drogue.

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Baumgartner is also renowned for the particularly dangerous nature of the stunts he has performed during his career. Baumgartner spent time in the Austrian military where he practiced parachute jumping, including training to land on small target zones.

Baumgartner’s most recent project was Red Bull Stratos, in which he jumped to Earth from a helium balloon in the stratosphere on 14 October 2012. As part of this project, he set the altitude record for a manned balloon flight, parachute jump from the highest altitude, and greatest free fall velocity.

Biography

Tribute to Felix Baumgartner in Straße der Sieger, Mariahilfer Street,Vienna.

Felix Baumgartner was born on 20 April 1969, in Salzburg, Austria. As a child, he dreamed about flying and skydiving. In 1999 he claimed the world record for the highest parachute jump from a building when he jumped from the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. On 20 July 2003, Baumgartner became the first person to skydive across the English Channel using a specially made carbon fiber wing. Alban Geissler, who developed the SKYRAY carbon fiber wing with Christoph Aarns, suggested after Baumgartner’s jump that the wing he used was a copy of two prototype SKYRAY wings sold to Red Bull (Baumgartner’s sponsor) two years earlier.

Baumgartner also set the world record for the lowest BASE jump ever, when he jumped 29 metres (95 ft) from the hand of the Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro. This jump also stirred controversy among BASE jumpers who pointed out that Baumgartner cited the height of the statue as the height of the jump even though he landed on a slope below the statue’s feet, and that other BASE jumpers had previously jumped from the statue but avoided publicity.

He became the first person to BASE jump from the completed Millau Viaduct in France on 27 June 2004 and the first person to skydive onto, then BASE jump from, the Turning Torso building in Malmö, Sweden, on 18 August 2006. On 12 December 2007 he became the first person to jump from the 91st floor observation deck of the then-tallest completed building in the world, Taipei 101 in Taipei, Taiwan.

Red Bull Stratos 578381_10151308162583804_1484802947_n

At 12:08 MDT and at an altitude of 39 kilometres (24 mi), Baumgartner jumped from the capsule.

In January 2010, it was reported that Baumgartner was working with a team of scientists and sponsor Red Bull to attempt the highest sky-dive on record.

Test jumps

On 15 March 2012, Baumgartner completed the first of 2 test jumps from 21,818 metres (71,581 ft). During the jump, he spent approximately three minutes and 43 seconds in free fall, reaching speeds of more than 580 km/h (360 mph), before opening his parachute. In total, the jump lasted approximately eight minutes and eight seconds and Baumgartner became the third person to safely parachute from a height of over 21.7 km (13.5 mi).

On 25 July 2012, Baumgartner completed the second of two planned test jumps from 29,460 metres (96,640 ft). It took Baumgartner about 90 minutes to reach the target altitude and his free fall was estimated to have lasted three minutes and 48 seconds before his parachutes were deployed.

Main jump

The launch was originally scheduled for 9 October 2012 but was aborted due to adverse weather conditions. Launch was rescheduled and the mission instead took place on 14 October 2012 when Baumgartner landed in eastern New Mexico after jumping from-a then world record (later it was broken by Alan Eustace in 2014), 38,969.3 metres (127,852 feet) and falling a record distance of 36,402.6 metres. On the basis of updated data, Baumgartner also set the record for the highest manned balloon flight (at the same height) and fastest speed of free fall at 1,357.64 km/h (843.6 mph), making him the first human to break the sound barrier outside a vehicle.[7][34] Baumgartner was in free fall for 4 minutes and 19 seconds, 17 seconds short of mentor Joseph Kittinger‘s 1960 jump.

Training for the jump

Baumgartner initially struggled with claustrophobia after spending time in the pressurized suit required for the jump, but overcame it with help from asports psychologist and other specialists.

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In 2014, Baumgartner decided to join Audi Motorsport to drive an Audi R8 LMS for the 2014 24 Hours of Nurburgring after racing Volkswagen Polos in 2013. He underwent another intense physical and driver training session to prepare him for the race. He helped the team to a 9th place overall finish.Personal life

In October 2012, when Baumgartner was asked in an interview with the Austrian newspaper Kleine Zeitung whether a political career was an option for his future life, he stated that the “example of Arnold Schwarzenegger” showed, that “you can’t move anything in a democracy” and that he would opt for a “moderate dictatorship […] led by experienced personalities coming from the private (sector of the) economy”. He finally stated he “didn’t want to get involved in politics.”

On 6 November 2012 Baumgartner was convicted of battery and was fined €1500 after punching a Greek truck driver in the face.

After Austrian authorities refused to grant sports tax breaks to Baumgartner, he moved to Arbon, Switzerland, whereupon his house in Salzburg and his helicopter were seized.

Baumgartner dated Playboy German playmate of the century Gitta Saxx. Later he was engaged to Nicole Öttl, a model and former beauty queen (MissLower Austria 2006). They broke up in 2013.

His mother is named Eva, and he has one brother, Gerard Baumgartner.

Awards and accolades

  • In 2012 he won the Bambi award in the category of “Millennium”.
  • In December 2012, Felix was named one of “The Men of the Year 2012” by Top Gear (magazine).
  • He was named Laureus World Action Sportsperson of the Year (12 March 2013).
  • He received the Mankind Award at The 2013 Spike Guys’ Choice Awards.
  • Flying (magazine) ranked him number 46 on their 2013 list of the “51 Heroes of Aviation”; he was the youngest-ranked living person on the list.

Delhi Dynamos are passionate about organic growth

Bharat Kapur, development manager, Delhi Dynamos FC, talks about his team’s grassroots plans.
Your football journey:

Once I completed my education, I joined Trinity Sports Management, which is into grassroots football. I then moved to the Baichung Bhutia Football Schools and then got into the corporate and marketing side of football with Anglian Management Group. I’ve come a full circle and am back to grassroots now, with the Delhi Dynamos as development manager!

Your team’s focus on grassroots football:
The basic objective is to create a huge funnel, and get in as many kids as possible to play football. Once we get in the kind of quantity that we’re talking about into the funnel, the objective is to whittle that down to the final 30-40 kids whom we can train in an elite youth set-up.

Organic growth is something that the club is very passionate about. Delhi is like a mini India – there are people from all over the country here, who could potentially support various Hero Indian Super League teams. The key for us is to build a community within Delhi for the Delhi Dynamos, and actually create that passion within the people that they don’t end up supporting any other club.

The benefits of a foreign technical tie-up:
Big clubs abroad are way ahead of us in the learning curve, so they’re providing us with the expertise, the knowledge, and a lot of human capital as well.
We’ve tied up with Feyenoord, and the Dutch are one of the pioneers when it comes to youth development. Usually foreign clubs come in mainly for the marketing and so on, but Feyenoord really want to help us with grassroots football and youth development, and I see this as a huge step for Indian football that a club of such stature has joined hands with us.

Your grassroots vision:
I picture every kid playing football – that’s my idea of grassroots football. It’s about having good coaches around who are very passionate about the game, are open to new ideas, and are keen on learning new ways on how to teach kids. Grassroots football is about just ensuring that everybody – including the coaches – have fun, with a certain learning and development element to that as well.

Your city’s unique advantages & disadvantages:
I think our biggest advantage is also our biggest disadvantage – the sheer size of the city! If you include suburbs like Noida, Faridabad, Gurgaon and Ghaziabad, it’s a huge place. So we potentially have a massive talent pool across the city, but traveling to all corners of the city and finding that talent will be a challenge.

Your team’s immediate grassroots plans:
We basically want to reach out to as many schools as possible. We’ve reached out to a huge number (about 100) already, and gotten them to participate in an inter-zonal tournament. We’re also going to have a ‘train the trainers’ workshop which we’re going to conduct over the next six months.
Our scouts will pick about 50 kids from the under-14 and 50 kids from the under-17 category, and they’re going to be participating in another tournament, as well as train under the Baichung Bhutia Football Schools. So they’re going to train as well as compete. And then they are going to get whittled down to 30 kids in each category. That’s the funnel I was talking about – that we get the maximum number of kids in, and get the cream out.

(This article is taken from: http://www.indiansuperleague.com/grassroots/107-delhi-dynamos-are-passionate-about-organic-growth)

Pro basketball league a big boon for India: American coach

(the link of the article: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/more-sports/others/Pro-basketball-league-a-big-boon-for-India-American-coach/articleshow/35558237.cms)

NEW DELHI: India’s basketball coach Scott Flemming lays great store by the proposed professional league on the lines of the Indian Premier League (IPL) and feels it can do wonders to the sport in the country – but not overnight.

“The professional basketball is a great idea and the the country badly needs it,” Flemming who has also served as the coach and athletic director at Mount Vernon Nazarene University in Ohio, said.

Flemming, who has over 30 years of collegiate and professional experience in the US as head coach of the men’s national team, said the professional basketball league, floated by the Basketball Federation of India (BFI) and IMG-Reliance and scheduled for next summer, should make the sport so popular that the players could make a living out of it.

The former Texas Legends assistant coach felt that the league will spread the canvas, making the selection of national players a lot tougher.

“I agree that a two-month league would not improve the quality of players overnight, but one must start somewhere,” said Flemming.

Most top Indian players are semi-professionals – working in banks, the railways or public sector undertakings – and they play in tournaments organised by either the BFI or in privately-sponsored tournaments.

“The league will give a boost by improving the infrastructure and increasing the pool of players and their quality. Above all, Indian players will have a big platform to become full-time professionals. And I’m sure with time the league could expand and become a year-long affair,” Flemming said.

“Automatically, the number of qualified coaches and referees will go up and with all these positives Indian basketball would get a tremendous image makeover,” he added.

Basketball’s popularity is on the rise in the country and one big reason is the growing fan following of the NBA thanks to the change in telecast timings.

Till last year, all NBA matches started before 5 a.m. India time and adjustments have now been made to the weekend matches to cater to the Asian market, especially India and China. Earlier, for example an Eastern Conference clash which tipped off at around 7 p.m. equated to 4.30 a.m. in New Delhi.

Before the start of the 2013-14 NBA season, NBA commissioner David Stern announced that the timings of some of the weekend matches would be changed. Thus, these matches start at 8 a.m. (Eastern Conference matches) and 9.30 a.m. (Western Conference matches).

Basketball Federation of India CEO Roopam Sharma said the constitution of the league would be on the lines of IMG-R’s other venture, the Indian Super League — a two-month eight-city franchise football tournament scheduled for later this year.

“IMG-R are readying a blueprint for the tournament and it is expected to be similar to the ISL. There would be teams from all the major metro cities and is scheduled to start around July-September 2015,” Sharma said.

With the ISL having faced teething administrative problems as it even had to be postponed twice, Flemming cautioned against jumping the gun and expecting big things immediately.

“This is a new initiative, there are bound to be administrative and logistical roadblocks, it’s not going to be smooth sailing. But this is a long-term project. The seeds have been sown, now we have to wait patiently for it to bear fruit. The process can be lengthy.”

Flemming is certain many American and European hoopsters would be more than happy to be part of the professional league.

“There are many players back in the US, I know personally, would be ready – they are very good but there are just so many players around that not everyone can get into the NBA so they play in smaller divisions or leagues elsewhere.

“Another reason why good foreign players will come is that the league is slated in the off-season. They will see it as a great opportunity to come here for two months and make some money.”

Fleaming was all praise for BFI’s new two-year collaboration with infrastructure major Jaypee that allows the national teams to use the world class Jaypee Greens facilities in Greater Noida.

“The Jaypee Greens facility is the best I have seen in the country. We have been having our camp there for almost four weeks and the players are really enjoying the facilities. We can already see some improvement fitness-wise.

“We need to make such facilities a standard for the national team in other parts of the country. It’s also a great source of motivation for many of of the state-level players to get good enough to play for India,” Flemming concluded.

You Only Live Once, Do It Warren Buffett’s Way

“You’d get very rich if you thought of yourself as having a card with only twenty punches in a lifetime, and every financial decision used up one punch. You’d resist the temptation to dabble. You’d make more good decisions and you’d make more big decisions.” —Warren Buffett , quoted in The Snowball, by Alice Schroeder

This week, Warren Buffett celebrates his 84th birthday.

Those of you who follow my blogs know I have a bit of a man crush on Buffett, not just because of his investing acumen but because he has always seemed to me endowed with a kind of uber-common sense… an ability to cut to the heart of a situation or an issue and capture it in a few words, understandable to experts and common folk alike.

Lists of his “10-greatest” or “18-greatest” (or however-many-greatest) sayings pop up everywhere in online searches. But the Buffett-ism that’s stayed with me is the one at the top of this blog – namely, the notion of a punch card (a quaintly antiquated thing you don’t run across very often these days).

Buffett used his punch card analogy in an investment context. It’s consistent with his belief that really profitable investment decisions are few and far between. His counsel to individual investors has always been to “wait for the fat pitch.” [See “Bored Investors Beware.”]

But I think the punch card analogy applies equally well to life, and to the decisions that define and shape our lives over the five, six, seven or eight decades most of us are on the earth. For someone graduating from high school, I think the number 20 is just about right. For someone like me, in middle age, the number of un-punched punches on the card is a lot smaller. There might be only two or three left.

The point is, whether it’s two or twenty, the number of inflection points in our lives is a lot smaller than it often seems. The trick is having the wisdom, or the instinct, to recognize “fat pitches” at the time they show up, which is always easier in hindsight. Then we need to make our big decisions count.

Getting married. Having children (or not). Making a career change. Starting or investing in a business. Those are obvious hole punches.

By contrast, the last two times I punched my card it had less to do with me, personally, than it did the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of others.

The first of these was agreeing to chair Wall Street’s advocacy group – the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association – in the wake of the financial crisis. I did so because I never wanted our clients, the investing public, to have to go through again the trauma and disruption they experienced in their financial and personal lives during that unprecedented and volatile period.

My second recent hole punch was deciding to help lead, in 2011 and 2012, a campaign to defeat a constitutional amendment that would have banned same-sex marriage in my home state of Minnesota. I got a lot of advice and counsel against getting involved, as a business leader, in what became known as the “Vote No” campaign. But every bone in my body told me this was a once-in-a-lifetime chance to make a difference in the lives of tens of thousands of LGBT residents in a state long known for its progressive brand, inclusive culture and values of respect and tolerance.

As it turned out, the support of the business community was critical not only in defeating the amendment, but then, six months later, legalizing same-sex marriage in Minnesota.

That was last year. Just this month, two gay friends who had lived together for 34 years before getting married last year at Minneapolis’ City Hall thanked me, with tears in their eyes, for being able to celebrate their first ever wedding anniversary.

I wish someone had told me about Buffett’s punch card analogy when I was a lot younger. However, I’m glad I have the opportunity to use it now to recognize and lean into the few remaining “big decisions” in my life. I pass it on here as a birthday gift to others – not from me, but from Warren Buffett, who, by the simple arithmetic of his own analogy, has made a big decision once in every four of his 84 years.

John G. Taft is CEO of RBC Wealth Management – U.S., and author of Stewardship: Lessons Learned from the Lost Culture of Wall Street (Wiley, 2012). RBC Wealth Management-U.S. is a division of RBC Capital Markets, LLC, a member of NYSE/FINRA/SIPC.

ARTICLE LINK:

https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140827165018-229992090-you-only-live-once-do-it-warren-buffett-s-way

You Only Live Once, Do It Warren Buffett’s Way

“You’d get very rich if you thought of yourself as having a card with only twenty punches in a lifetime, and every financial decision used up one punch. You’d resist the temptation to dabble. You’d make more good decisions and you’d make more big decisions.” —Warren Buffett , quoted in The Snowball, by Alice Schroeder

This week, Warren Buffett celebrates his 84th birthday.

Those of you who follow my blogs know I have a bit of a man crush on Buffett, not just because of his investing acumen but because he has always seemed to me endowed with a kind of uber-common sense… an ability to cut to the heart of a situation or an issue and capture it in a few words, understandable to experts and common folk alike.

Lists of his “10-greatest” or “18-greatest” (or however-many-greatest) sayings pop up everywhere in online searches. But the Buffett-ism that’s stayed with me is the one at the top of this blog – namely, the notion of a punch card (a quaintly antiquated thing you don’t run across very often these days).

Buffett used his punch card analogy in an investment context. It’s consistent with his belief that really profitable investment decisions are few and far between. His counsel to individual investors has always been to “wait for the fat pitch.” [See “Bored Investors Beware.”]

But I think the punch card analogy applies equally well to life, and to the decisions that define and shape our lives over the five, six, seven or eight decades most of us are on the earth. For someone graduating from high school, I think the number 20 is just about right. For someone like me, in middle age, the number of un-punched punches on the card is a lot smaller. There might be only two or three left.

The point is, whether it’s two or twenty, the number of inflection points in our lives is a lot smaller than it often seems. The trick is having the wisdom, or the instinct, to recognize “fat pitches” at the time they show up, which is always easier in hindsight. Then we need to make our big decisions count.

Getting married. Having children (or not). Making a career change. Starting or investing in a business. Those are obvious hole punches.

By contrast, the last two times I punched my card it had less to do with me, personally, than it did the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of others.

The first of these was agreeing to chair Wall Street’s advocacy group – the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association – in the wake of the financial crisis. I did so because I never wanted our clients, the investing public, to have to go through again the trauma and disruption they experienced in their financial and personal lives during that unprecedented and volatile period.

My second recent hole punch was deciding to help lead, in 2011 and 2012, a campaign to defeat a constitutional amendment that would have banned same-sex marriage in my home state of Minnesota. I got a lot of advice and counsel against getting involved, as a business leader, in what became known as the “Vote No” campaign. But every bone in my body told me this was a once-in-a-lifetime chance to make a difference in the lives of tens of thousands of LGBT residents in a state long known for its progressive brand, inclusive culture and values of respect and tolerance.

As it turned out, the support of the business community was critical not only in defeating the amendment, but then, six months later, legalizing same-sex marriage in Minnesota.

That was last year. Just this month, two gay friends who had lived together for 34 years before getting married last year at Minneapolis’ City Hall thanked me, with tears in their eyes, for being able to celebrate their first ever wedding anniversary.

I wish someone had told me about Buffett’s punch card analogy when I was a lot younger. However, I’m glad I have the opportunity to use it now to recognize and lean into the few remaining “big decisions” in my life. I pass it on here as a birthday gift to others – not from me, but from Warren Buffett, who, by the simple arithmetic of his own analogy, has made a big decision once in every four of his 84 years.

John G. Taft is CEO of RBC Wealth Management – U.S., and author of Stewardship: Lessons Learned from the Lost Culture of Wall Street (Wiley, 2012). RBC Wealth Management-U.S. is a division of RBC Capital Markets, LLC, a member of NYSE/FINRA/SIPC.

ARTICLE LINK:

https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140827165018-229992090-you-only-live-once-do-it-warren-buffett-s-way

Redeem shape!

Unfortunately, staying active is a lifestyle that we as a population have grown out of. But you can regain this commitment by following these five rules.

Break a sweat every day

Challenge yourself every day to participate in a physical activity that causes you to get out of breath or sweat. To change your body, you must train outside of your comfort zone. If you like your body the way it is, then don’t stress it. But if you want to build strength, get a six-pack or lose fat, then work hard.

When exercising, you should not be able to carry on a conversation with your buddy. (Don’t get me started on people reading a magazine on the treadmill.) Next time you’re at the gym:
• Increase your weights
• Hit the incline on your treadmill or run hills
• Add a plyometrics workout
• Combine strength training with various rounds of conditioning; for example, perform a Overhead Shoulder Press, then sprint on a treadmill at nine mph on a six-inch incline for 30 seconds. Rest for 90 seconds and repeat four times.

Go back to grade school

You did it all when you were younger: jumped rope, climbed trees, went bike riding and ran sprints around the playground. You couldn’t sit still long enough to stay at a desk or computer like you do now.
Become more active. Go for a walk or jog in the morning before starting your day. Join a group fitness class, recreational league, swim club, ski or bowling team.

Use what you have

Look around and take a quick inventory of what’s available to exercise with. Do you have a bike, rope, old tires to flip, chains to pull, balls to throw, boxes to jump on or paint cans to carry? If you have some of this stuff and a creative mind, you can put together a great workout. You don’t need a expensive gym membership to look expensive. (Got a rope? Five Reasons to Go Back to Basics With the Jump Rope.)

Eat clean
By eating as clean as you can, you’ll automatically avoid foods loaded with sugar, trans fat, and saturated fat. Eat foods that display a variety of colors more frequently, and keep everything in moderation. Plan time to go to the grocery store so you are not rushed. Also, plan your weekly meals ahead of time. (See What’s Fake and What’s Real? The Ultimate Food Survival Guide andNo, Really—Don’t Shop When You’re Hungry: A Study.)

Rest as hard as you work

There’s a fine line between the amount of work you do and the rest that you allow yourself. Rest can take the form of physical rest, or, for most of us, mental rest. Exercising, deep breathing, and vacations will take care of your mental rest. If you feel physically exhausted, try switching up your workout routine or take a week off. You will come back fresh and ready to do more. (See Why You Shouldn’t Work Out Every Day.)

HIT IT ON!!

How to run

This running plan is for beginners to go from 0 to running 30 minutes nonstop – in 4 weeks.

WHO SHOULD FOLLOW THIS RUNNING PROGRAM?

This plan is suitable for beginners who are fit and have exercised before (e.g. cycling, rowing, etc.), but are novice runners. Therefore, you should be able to walk briskly for 30 minutes several times a week before you start this program.

If you are already able to run, then join the program at the appropriate level. However, consider that being able run for 10 minutes nonstop once a week is easier than running it 4 times per week. Therefore, be objective. This program is only 4 weeks long anyway. That’s nothing. Hopefully you’ll be running regularly lifelong.

Your aim is to make small, consistent steps, not huge leaps. Running isn’t something you learn and the next day you can run. Progression is gradual. Your body has to adapt to the high-impact of running. This doesn’t happen instantly. With every run, your joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments and bones get stronger and more robust. You slowly adapt and improve your running style to be more efficient and rhythmical. It is then that you really start to enjoy running.

RUNNING INTENSITY

During the running phase of the workout, you should be running at moderate intensity. This corresponds to about 70% of maximum heart rate and you should be able to pass the “talk test”. Passing the “talk test” means that you are able to speak in sentences, if running with a running partner. However, if you can only answer in one word grunts you are running too fast. On the other hand, you should not be able to carry on long conversation and give paragraph style answers.

RUNNING & RECOVERY

Try to allow for a day of recovery between your running workouts and avoid running 4 consecutive days. It is during recovery that your body adapts to the stress of the workout by getting stronger and fitter. This goes for your leg muscles, as much as for your heart and lungs. This is why you want to progress slowly, because you need to stress your body with small stresses. You body recovers, adapts, and becomes stronger. This is progression. However, if you place too great a strain on your body, you become tired, sore and risk injury. As you become increasingly athletic, your body becomes accustomed to the cycle of stress and recovery and you require less time to recover from your previous run. Also, check out the infographic on running form.

THE RUNNING PROGRAM

This is a 4-week run/ walk plan consisting of 4 workouts a week. If you only manage to fit 3 workouts into one week, add it to the following week. If you move on to the next week but don’t feel able to do the workout, stay on the previous level until you’re ready. Don’t worry about it. Listen to your body and go at your own pace. Some people will repeat a workout early on and then whiz through the rest without problem, others may find the fourth week more challenging and some may have no problems at all. Everyone is different.

Don’t forget to stretch before and after your workout. Also, check with your doctor before starting a new exercise program, especially if you have a medical condition.

  

WEEK 1

 

Warm-up
Walk

Run-Walk Plan

Cool-down
Walk

Total Duration

1st

10 min

1 min run, 1 min walk (5x)

10 min

30 min

2nd

10 min

1 min run, 1 min walk (7x)

5 min

29 min

3rd

10 min

2 min run, 1 min walk (5x)

5 min

30 min

4th

5 min

2 min run, 1 min walk (7x)

4 min

30 min

 

WEEK 2

 

Warm-up
Walk

Run-Walk Plan

Cool-down
Walk

Total Duration

1st

5 min

3 min run, 1 min walk (5x)

5 min

30 min

2nd

5 min

5 min run, 2 min walk (3x)

4 min

30 min

3rd

4 min

5 min run, 1 min walk (4x)

2 min

30 min

4th

5 min

8 min run, 3 min walk (2x)

3 min

30 min

 

 WEEK 3

 

Warm-up
Walk

Run-Walk Plan

Cool-down
Walk

Total Duration

1st

5 min

10 min run, 5 min walk, 5 min run

5 min

30 min

2nd

5 min

12 min run, 3 min walk, 5 min run

5 min

30 min

3rd

10 min

15 min run

5 min

30 min

4th

6 min

18 min run

6 min

30 min

 

 WEEK 4

 

Warm-up
Walk

Run-Walk Plan

Cool-down
Walk

Total Duration

1st

5 min

20 min run

5 min

30 min

2nd

5 min

22 min run

3 min

30 min

3rd

3 min

25 min run

2 min

30 min

4th

2 min

30 min run

2 min

30 min

 

 

Be Yourself Anyway

People are often unreasonable, illogical, and self-centered; Forgive them anyway.

 

If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives; be kind anyway.

 

If you are successful, you will win some false friends and some true friends; succeed anyway.

 

If you are honest and frank, people may cheat you; be honest and frank anyway.

 

What you spend years building, someone could destroy overnight; build anyway.

 

If you find serenity and happiness, they may be jealous; be happy anyway.

 

The good you do today, people will often forget tomorrow; do good anyway.

 

Give the world your best anyway.

 

You see, in the final analysis, it is between you and God; It was never between you and them anyway.

 

-Mother Teresa